Open fire

The weekend before last I helped Joe Morgan fire his wood kiln, and he very kindly made space for some of my work in the kiln. Last Sunday, after what seemed a painfully long wait, we opened up the kiln.

LIDLIFTjulietmacleod2016
Joe lifting the lid, underneath you can just see kiln fibre and kiln shelves covering the ware chambers.

The wood/soda firing process is very different from what I know. It took me a while to get my head around the approach required… using a different clay, glazing only the inside of pieces, using oxide slips to work with the soda to create the characteristic glaze that comes with soda firing. Even though all the pieces I made are essentially tests it was hard not to be very excited to find out how they had come out.

OPEN2julietmacleod2016  FIRSTSTACK2julietmacleod2016
Kitty and Joe Morgan lifting the final kiln shelves to reveal the pots inside.
You can see Joe’s amazing teapots and some of Hilary Firth’s plates and jars.

As we had thought the first stack had fired well, but the other two did not reach the required temperature. That said the firing was better than the previous one – it takes time to bed in a new kiln and Joe has plans to make a few modifications before the next firing.

BOTTLEjulietmacleod2016  LIPjulietmacleod2016
GLAZE3julietmacleod2016  GLAZE2julietmacleod2016

Some of the slip combinations and decoration I tried worked quite well, the glaze liner didn’t go as glassy as I had hoped, and I think I threw things too finely as many pieces warped. I’ve learned a lot and have lots of ideas to take forward. Now I just need to make some more pots.

CARAFEjulietmacleod2016
This carafe was right at the front by the fire box so it got very hot.
It also welded itself to the kiln shelf, but there are some beautiful colours here.
The inside and rim has a celadon glaze, but there was just bare clay on the outside.
This is where the soda and wood ash have created their own magic.
BOTTLE2julietmacleod2016
This is perhaps my favorite piece from this firing, decorated in a copper/cobalt slip, with a celadon liner.
Where the soda has hit with full intensity it has created the strong blue glaze.
You can clearly see the other areas that received less soda.
These are more metallic in nature from the copper in the slip.

With huge thanks to Joe Morgan for such an amazing experience, and to Hilary Firth, Joseph Travis and Robin Palmer for such good company.

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